Sumner-Fredericksburg Schools

Committed to excellence in lifelong learning, leadership, and character.

 

SUMNER-FREDERICKSBURG

COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

 

DISTRICT DEVELOPED SERVICE DELIVERY PLAN

FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

 

DRAFT 2017

as of 3-7-17

 

 

Process Used to Develop the Delivery System for Eligible Individuals

This district-developed service delivery plan was developed in accordance with the Iowa Administrative Code Rule 41.408(2)“C.” The group of individuals who developed the plan included parents of eligible individuals, special education teachers, general education teachers, administrators and AEA staff. The Sumner CSD Board of Directors approved the process for developing this service delivery plan and DDSDP committee membership on March 2, 2017

District Developed Service Delivery Plan (DDSDP) Development Group

  • Rick Pederson – Sumner-Fredericksburg CSD Superintendent
  • Kurt Volker – Durant Elementary Principal
  • Allan Eckelman – Sumner-Fredericksburg High School Principal
  • Greg Koppes – AEA 267 Administrator (Appointed by AEA 267 Director of Special Education)
  • Kelly Beck, AEA 267 School Psychologist
  • Jane Brooks, Fredericksburg Elementary Special Education Teacher
  • Kristi Hrdlicka: Parent and Special Education Teacher at Durant Elementary
  • Ryan Dougan, Special Education Teacher, S-F High School & Parent
  • Renee Maher: Elementary General Education Teacher in Sumner and Fredericksburg
  • Jill Glenn, Sumner-Fredericksburg Middle School and Fredericksburg Elementary Principal
  • Bob Newbrough, Sumner-Fredericksburg MS Special Education Teacher
  • Adam Harrenstein: Special Education Teacher assigned to Durant Elementary
  • Kelsie Hammond Fredericksburg Elementary General Education Teacher
  • Brad Mohs, Sumner-Fredericksburg HS General Education Teacher
  • Kara Johns, Parent and Educational Assistant assigned to Fredericksburg Elementary


How will services be organized and provided to eligible individuals?

Regular Early Childhood Program Monitored by Licensed Early Childhood Special Education Staff: Services are defined as occurring in the general education classroom. The classroom teacher holds a license for pre-kindergarten. The general education teacher is responsible for classroom instruction and implementation of accommodations, modifications and adaptations as specified in the IEP. A certified Early Childhood Special Education Teacher/Consultant is responsible for monitoring the implementation of services described in each IEP and monitoring student progress relative to IEP goals.

Grades Pk-12 Consulting Teacher Services: Consulting teacher services are defined as indirect services provided by a certified special education teacher to a general education teacher in adjusting the learning environment, modifying the curriculum, and/or modifying instructional methods. Specially designed instructional strategies will be used to meet the individual needs of a student with a disability receiving instruction in the general education classroom.

Grades Pk-12 Collaborative Services: Collaborative services are defined as specially designed instruction planned by a certified special education teacher in collaboration with a general education teacher. Services are provided to an individual student with a disability or to a group of students with disabilities by a certified special education teacher or an educational assistant in a general education classroom setting. Collaborative services are designed to aid the student(s) in accessing the general education curriculum. Collaborative services are provided simultaneously with the general education content area instruction.

Grades Pk--12 Co-Teaching Services: Co-teaching services are defined as the provision of specially designed instruction and academic instruction provided to a group of students with disabilities and nondisabled students. These services are provided by a special education teacher and a general education teacher in partnership to meet the content and skills needs of students in the general education classroom. These services take shape in a variety of ways. For example, teachers co-plan, divide the class, and provide the instruction to smaller groups, or teachers co-plan and then co-instruct different components of the content.

Grades Pk-12 Pull-out Supplemental Instruction: Pull-out supplemental instruction is defined as specially designed instruction provided to an individual student with a disability or a group of students with disabilities by a certified special education teacher in a special education setting. Pull-out instructional services are designed to supplement instruction provided in the general education classroom through the previously described consulting teacher model, co-teaching model, and collaborative model of service delivery. Supplemental instruction provided in a pull-out setting does not supplant instruction provided in the general education classroom.

Grades Pk-12 General Education Content Consultation: General education content consultation services are defined as direct specially designed instruction provided to an individual student with a disability or to a group of students with disabilities by a certified special education teacher in a special education setting to aid the student(s) in accessing the general education content area instruction. A general education teacher licensed in the core content area collaborates with a special education teacher to jointly plan lessons and instructional strategies. The general education teacher supervises the curriculum and is responsible for assigning student grades. The special education teacher is responsible for providing direct instruction. Both teachers are responsible for on-going progress monitoring and formative assessment. General education content consultation is a model of service delivery used only with a small number of students who exhibit significant cognitive or behavioral skill deficits, yet are expected to achieve district standards rather than alternative standards. Documentation of regular and frequent consultation, joint planning, and assessment of student progress is required.

Grades Pk-8 Special Class Services: Special class services are defined as direct specially designed instruction provided to an individual student with disability or a group of students with disabilities by a certified special education teacher to provide instruction which is tied to the general education curriculum, but has been modified to meet the unique needs of the student(s) in a self-contained setting (including, but not limited to special classes, special schools, home instruction, and instruction in hospitals and institutions). This means the student is receiving his or her primary instruction separate from non-disabled peers.

Work Experience Services: Students age 14 and older who are eligible for special education services may receive work experience instruction.  Work experience instruction is typically offered during 11th and 12th grade. For students to receive work experience instruction, specific career/vocational needs must be identified on the IEP.  A work experience/transition specialist will collaborate with a HS special education teacher to make arrangements for a student to engage in job shadowing or explore work sites on a part-time, temporary basis in the community. There must be class work preparation prior to and/or concurrent with job shadowing and work site exploration.

Notes:

  • The continuum includes services for eligible individuals ages 3-21.
  • Students may receive different services at multiple points along the continuum based on their IEP.
  • The district will provide access to this continuum for all eligible individuals based on their IEP.
  • Services may be provided within the district or through contractual agreement with other districts and/or agencies, including Area Education Agency 267.
  • Early Childhood Services available through contractual agreement with other districts and/or AEA 267 include services provided in an Early Childhood Special Education Program by a licensed early childhood special education teacher and services provided in a Regular Early Childhood Program by a teacher holding endorsements as both a prekindergarten teacher and an early childhood special education teacher.

 

How will caseloads of special education teachers be determined and regularly monitored?

The building principal and an AEA 267 team representative will review special education teacher rosters at least 3 times per year. Roster reviews will be scheduled as follows:

  1. 1.At the beginning of the school year (August/September)
  2. 2.During the month of November (following Special Education Child Count)
  3. 3.During the month of April (to project rosters and make plans for next school year)

A teacher’s caseload will be reviewed when either of the following occurs:

  1. 1.The number of students on a teacher’s roster, the level of services these students receive, and the amount of time a teacher spends engaged in joint planning/collaboration indicates a need to conduct a caseload review.
  2. 2.A special education teacher expresses concern about his/her ability to effectively perform the essential functions of his/her job due to caseload.

Example of Caseload Determination Review

Caseload determinations will be made by assigning points for the intensity of service required by each IEP on a teacher’s roster. Each student is assigned 1, 2, or 3 points based on level of intensity of services.

1 Point   Student needs limited accommodations/modifications to the general curriculum that require special education personnel to provide specially designed instruction for less than 50% of the school day. Student’s IEP has 1 to 2 goal areas requiring specially designed instruction.

2 Points  Student needs significant accommodations/modifications to the general curriculum that require special education personnel to provide specially designed instruction for 50% to 85% of the school day or the student has 3 to 4 goal areas on his/her IEP that require specially designed instruction

3 Points  Student needs significant adaptations/modifications to the learning environment or curriculum that require intensive instructional strategies. One of the following must apply:

  1. oAlternate assessment is used to monitor the IEP.
  2. oSpecial education personnel provide specially designed instruction more than 85% of the school day.
  3. oBehavior intensity is such that a Functional Behavior Assessment and Behavior Intervention Plan are implemented, and monitored.
  4. oStudent’s IEP has 5 or more goal areas requiring specially designed instruction.

Joint Planning Considerations for Co-Teaching

Additional points are assigned based on the teacher’s time spent joint planning with general education teachers or paraprofessionals. This is calculated for the teacher and not for individual students.

1 Point   Special education teacher conducts joint planning with general teacher(s) and/or para professional over the course of a month for up to 2 hours of time.

2 Points  Special education teacher conducts joint planning with general education teacher(s) and/or para-professional over a course of a month for 2 to 4 hours of time.

3 Points  Special education teacher conducts joint planning with general education teacher(s) and/or

               paraprofessional over a course of a month for more than 4 hours of time.

In general, a special education teacher’s caseload should not exceed 24 points. The assignment of education assistants must be taken into consideration and may be used to compensate for a caseload that exceeds 24 points. Caseloads of 24 points or more will be considered for further review.

Example of Caseload Calculation

14 students on roster x 1 point = 14 points

1 student on roster      x 2 points = 2 points

1 student on roster      x 3 points = 3 points

19 total student points + 2 points awarded for joint Co-teaching planning

(Teacher meets with general education math teacher 2-4 hours in a month in order to plan co-teaching)

21 total points for caseload determination

What procedures will a special education teacher use to resolve caseload concerns?

 

Special education teachers are expected to engage in informal problem solving with their building principal and AEA 267 team representative prior to submitting a formal request for caseload review.

Steps to follow when a teacher formally requests a caseload review:

  1. 1.Teacher will submit a request for caseload review in writing to the building principal.
  1. 2.Within ten working days, the building principal will meet with the special education teacher and AEA 267 team representative to review and clarify concerns the teacher has expressed about his/her caseload.
    1. a.The teacher requesting the review is responsible for gathering relevant information to support his/her request for a caseload review. This information might include, but is not limited to:
    2. Number of IEP’s

                     ii) Teacher’s schedule and instructional grouping

         iii) Collaboration and co-teaching assignments

                     iv) Number of buildings that teacher is assigned

b.An attempt will be made to resolve the teacher’s caseload concerns informally at that time.

c. The building principal will provide a written response to the teacher’s request.

  1. 3.If the teacher’s caseload concern cannot be satisfactorily resolved, the teacher’s written request and the principal’s written response will be sent forward to the district superintendent.
  1. 4.The district superintendent and AEA 267 special education coordinator will review the request and gather relevant information from the principal, special education teacher and AEA 267 team representative.
  1. 5.Within 10 working days following receipt of the teacher’s formal request for caseload review, the district superintendent will send a written determination to the building principal and special education teacher.
  1. 6.If the teacher requesting review does not agree with the written determination made by the district superintendent, the teacher may appeal to the AEA 267 Director of Special Education or his/her designee.
  1. 7.The AEA 267 Director of Special Education or his/her designee will meet with personnel involved and render a written decision.
  1. 8.If a district is exceeding the limits specified in this plan, it may ask the AEA 267 Special Education Director to grant an adjusted caseload status.

How will the delivery system for eligible individuals meet the targets identified in the state’s performance plan and the LEA determination as assigned by the state? What process will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the delivery system for eligible individuals?

At least once per year, district administrators will examine their special education district profile to review the district’s data relative to progress indicators outlined in our state performance plan (SPP) for special education. District administrators will also examine the district’s annual progress report each year to review achievement data as it pertains to students with IEPs in the district. These data will be used to determine priorities and develop an action plan for special education instructional services when necessary.

If the district meets or exceeds APR goals and target goals outlined in our state performance plan for special education, the delivery system will be considered effective.

If the district does not meet APR goals or SPP target goals, district staff will work in collaboration with AEA 267 staff to develop an action plan designed to promote progress toward these goals.

 

 

It is the policy of Sumner-Fredericksburg Community School District not to illegally discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, disability, age, religion, creed, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity and socioeconomic status in its educational programs and its employment practices.

 

If you have questions or a grievance related to this policy, please click here to contact the Equity Coordinators.